Oregon Kids event report

From Facebook post of Coquillle Chess Club

Coquille Chess Club

Oregon Scholastic State Championships
It was a sunny weekend but in Seaside, nearly 400 chess players were indoors contending for the Oregon Scholastic State Championships at the Seaside Convention Center. Coos County had nine Coquille, two Myrtle Point and one North Bend player participating.
Joshua Grabinsky rated 2099 and listed as an Expert was the #1 seed stumbled early in the Middle School Platinum section as he drew Victor Dossin rated 1609 in the second round. Then all hope for becoming the national Barber candidate was dashed during the fourth round when he missed a good move for his opponent and he lost to Jack McClain rated 1717. Joshua won all his other games and slid into fifth place. His nemesis and friend Owen McCoy from Eugene won the Barber nomination.
Josiah Perkins rated 1880 was the #3 seed drew during the second round against William Adriance rated 1700. Then he lost in the fourth round as well against Venter Simon rated 1791 and drew his final round. He slid into honorable mention. Seth Talyansky from Portland won the Denker nomination.
A surprise crept up in the Elementary Cobalt section as Sawyer Bergstedt rated 958 had only two draws and also beat his teammate Riley Jones rated 863 to win second place in his division. He won a huge cup trophy filled with salt water taffy that he shared with his teammates and coach.
There were also some fun side events the prior evening. In the Blitz competition (speed chess), Zebadiah Zimmerman Coquille 5th grade won first place in his division. In the Bughouse competition (another fun variant of chess that is fast and made up of teams of two), Riley Jones and Daniel Carter with their team called Four Squares won first place as well as Josiah Perkins and Joshua Grabinsky with their team called Castel Insect-icide. Mavrick Macalino from North Bend won the crazy hat competition.
All players gained some valuable experience and want to attend again next year. Other players were Coquille: Jordan Henderson, Bridget Perry, Jordyn Westfall. From Myrtle Point: Margie Harris and Jonathan Padgett. From North Bend Mavrick Macalino.

CLICK HERE for USchess crosstable for the event.

Next South Coast Chess tournament will be June 24th at LaVerne Park and is open to all players of all ages and experience. It will be a potluck with hot dogs supplied. There is a $5.00 registration fee and outdoor toy prizes for winners. Watch for announcements or check out Coquille Chess Club on Facebook. Questions or more info: Nancy Keller 541 290-8479 or drnancykeller@yahoo.com.

Introducing the newbie NWC blogger

Hey!

So this is blogging. Hmm. It’s easy enough to share your news and opinion in a blog, I suppose. The real question is not whether you can write it, but whether anyone will read it. I like to write, and as an ego-inflated chessplayer, I know I’m pretty good at it. Judging by the quality of some rather successful internet writers I’ve seen, though, being good at it isn’t really necessary. The average reader doesn’t seem to care much about the quality of the writing or the coherence of the argument. (It’s not fair to pick on internet writers exclusively, of course. The quality of many best-sellers is also abysmal.)

Ah, that’s always a good way to start: insult your readers. Guaranteed to generate positive word of mouth. But of course you, dear reader, are not the average internet surfer, but rather are chess-blog readers of distinction and erudition (there, definitely getting back on track). So rather than shoveling any more, let me explain why I’m going to write the occasional post on the NWC blog, and why you should read it.

About two years ago, as I was winding down my most recent stint as editor of the print version of NWC magazine, I began working on an editorial. This was a labor based on one of my pet peeves (a fertile subject for bloggers in general), and in order to support my arguments I asked Rusty Miller to gather some data from back issues of NWC. He kindly took some time away from his genealogical research to dig into 30-year-old issues (probably stored in 30-year-old boxes, for all I know), and in general he confirmed my supposition.

In a nutshell: tournament prize funds and entry fees in Washington and Oregon today are substantially the same as they were 10, 20, and even 30 years ago. Chess money in the Pacific Northwest has not adjusted for inflation.

Well, that wasn’t very difficult. Why didn’t I write that editorial a couple years ago? What’s the trouble here? It doesn’t seem a very controversial conclusion — it’s really just a simple fact, right?

Yes… if that was all there is to it. It’s the side-effects, the unintended consequences, the well-meaning, knee-jerk, populist tournament organizers and chess clubs, the political repercussions… (Huh? What’s he going on about now?)

Here’s what’s been happening. Adult tournament participation has been declining. One reason for this is the internet, of course. You can go online to any number of free or fee sites to play games any time of the day or night. It’s mostly blitz, but there’s always someone there to play, more or less at your level, no driving to a club at hours of their convenience, no parking, no waiting for a game. Heck, if you want you can play naked, no one will know. Go ahead and scarf that pizza, you’ll only smear your own computer, and if you just want to watch there are probably some very strong players duking it out. It’s not exactly tournament chess. Prizes are rare and difficult to win, and you can’t go out to lunch with your buddies or your opponent to post-mortem the game. Every so often you get whomped by a computer cheat… But I digress.

The point is that when fewer people come out to play at the local club tournament, the state or regional championship, or what have you, the tournament organizers try to figure out how to get the numbers back up, or at least hold onto the players that they have. And the very first knee-jerk impulse is this: lower entry fees. Yes, by making it cheaper to play chess, it becomes more accessible to more players. More people will come, right?

Wrong. For two reasons.

First, lower entry fees means lower prizes. Second, if you lower the cost, you make it more accessible… to whom? People who have little money.

Not everyone plays for prize money, of course. A vast majority really can’t expect to win prize money at most tournaments, right? So, does it matter if there are prizes? Many chessplayers play for the love of the game. Yes, but many don’t want to invest a bunch of money as well as their time just for the love of the game. As it also pertains to the lack of inflation in entry fees and prizes at relatively high-end events, it’s important to note the principle is not the expectation of winning, but the reasonable (read: optimistic) possibility of winning. And the amount your inflated ego says you have a semi-realistic chance at must be about double, or at least more than, what it would take to cover all expenses including entry fee, travel, and lodging. More on this later, complete with actual tournament data, but suffice to say that tournaments that might have seemed worthwhile to travel to a few decades ago now fail the test due to inflation.

Second, if you lower the cost, you make it more accessible… to whom? People who have little money. Like, college students, the unemployed, the homeless. People who spend all their cash on alcohol and cigarettes… (Nope, no stereotyping here.) I’m not saying there should not be events that cater to people with no money. However, keep in mind that millionaires rarely socialize at soup kitchens. (Huh? Let me elucidate.) If your club or tournament is designed to attract the dregs, don’t expect a lot of cream. (Oh yeah, sure, that was much more clear.) One last try: rich people don’t hang out with the unwashed. (Oh. So?)

Despite the large number of chessplayers who never do really amount to much in the world of business outside of chess (such as myself), there’s a small subset of players who actually get, you know, jobs and careers and the like. They usually disappear from chess for years or even decades while they make their way in the world, then they find some leisure time or start taking some of their three years of accumulated vacation time, and they look at playing in tournaments again. They are not, repeat, not, going to end up playing in the free-entry-no-prizes special at the club with 10 members who all smoke and play pinochle.

In 2011 the Portland Chess Club with their Centennial celebration tournament showed the way to bring some of these successful-type semi-retired former players out of the woodwork. They ran an event with $10,000 in prizes. The total number of players was significantly larger than a standard Oregon Open, which is normally the biggest event of the year in the Portland area, and there were quite a few faces returning to chess after extended absence.

Woo hoo! That Centennial was big, right? Huge prizes, way more than regular tournaments… Well, no, actually. Yes, it was bigger than anything seen recently (this was the year before the US Open came to the greater Portland area). But… Consider the Oregon Open. Over 30 years ago, the Oregon Open prize fund was $3000. Today, the Oregon Open prize fund is… $3000. If it had kept up with inflation, the Oregon Open would be offering something like $11,000. In other words, the Centennial was what the Oregon Open should be every year. The Centennial, in order to really be a big contrast, should have offered prizes on the order of $35,000.

The only tournaments that have, in fact, adjusted prizes (and entry fees) upward in the last 30 years (I’m not kidding) are the ones that got brief corporate sponsorship from Inside Chess back in the 1990s. Not to toot my own horn (too much), but in fact these were all events that I organized, and the sponsorship was my idea. I was wearing multiple chess hats back then, serving as WCF President as well as working at International Chess Enterprises, the publisher of Inside Chess. Starting with the 1992 Washington Chess Convention (featuring the Washington Open), and continuing with the Washington Class Championships, we upgraded these events from rather tiny local tournaments to gatherings worth traveling to play. That was the good news. The bad news is that since the mid-1990s, these events have also stagnated.

So, what’s the problem? Why don’t organizers just increase the entry fees and prizes? The risk (and every tournament involves risk to the organizer) would be proportionately the same as it was decades ago, right? Why not just go for it?

Inland Empire Open article

Posted by Spokane Chess Club on facebook:

HAVRILLA, CAMBARERI WIN INLAND EMPIRE OPEN
April 29-30
Top seeds Michael Cambareri and Mark Havrilla won this year’s Inland Empire Open with scores of 4.0. Mark beat Michael in round four, but was held to a final round draw while Michael scored a comeback victory in a fascinating game where his opponent had four pieces for a queen! Michael had the only perfect score after the first day’s action while Mark took a Saturday night bye to enter their showdown battle one half point behind.
A total of 29 players (and one house player) took part in this year’s installment of Spokane’s oldest weekend tournament. While Michael had the perfect score after the first day and Mark was the only returning player at 2.5, there were nine other players who finished the first day with 2.0 scores. That made for a bunch Wallaceof closely contested games on the final day — and the bunched up standings reflected the close nature of the competition. Four players finished third with scores of 3.5: Brad Bodie, Jonathan Geyman, Dan McCourt, and Karl Reutter. Jonathan, a rapidly rising provisionally-rated player, was also the top score in class C, while the other three also shared the class A prizes. The class B prizes were shared by Jason Cross and Kevin Korsmo with scores of 3.0. Second place in class C was shared by Walter van Heemstede Obelt and Ron Weyland, both of whom scored 2.5. Walter’s accomplishment was particularly impressive in that he was only able to play the first day due to work commitments.
Steve Wallace(3.0) won the class D first prize. Second in that section (at 2.5) was shared by Logan Faulkner and Rob Harder. Rob also scored a 606 point upset victory in the first round to claim the top upset prize. The tourney also featured six unrated players participating in their first USCF tourney.

CLICK HERE for USchess crosstable

Note: Jonathan Geyman also won the open division at the small unrated Lou Domanski Chess Festival in early April, beating James Stripes in round four. The last round had two teenagers on board one. Jonathan and Benjamin Nylund, who recently moved to Idaho from New Zealand. The Lou Domanski Chess festival had been known as the Sandpoint Community Chess Festival until renamed three years ago. It was started by Lou Domanski 26 years ago. Stripes has been the event’s TD since 2009.

Derek Zhang becomes National Master

National Master Derek Zhang

“After reaching 2100 USCF in 2015, my chess progress stagnated, but over these past few months I was able to put all the pieces together and reach 2200. My real breakthrough tournament was 3 months ago at the Golden State Open, where I scored 2.5/3 against FMs in the last 3 rounds to win the U2300 prize. After that, I knew it was just a matter of time until I reached NM, and in 2 more tournaments I had achieved my goal. It’s taken a while, but I’m glad I finally got there.”

-Derek

Congratulations to Derek Zhang of Bellevue, Washington, who achieved a 2200 U.S. Chess rating as a result of scoring 5 of 7 points in the U2200 section at the 11th Annual Philadelphia Open, Philadelphia, Pa., April 12-16.  Here is a link to the crosstable: http://www.uschess.org/msa/XtblMain.php?201704167042.2

Harmon Report from Portland CC website

11th Annual Clark Harmon Memorial Open (April 1-2): The Harmon Memorial currently rotates between Oregon and Washington each year and was in Oregon this year. Clark was one of the Northwest’s premier players and ambassadors of the game for many decades. See more information about Clark here and here. After the original Neil Dale Memorial Open was cancelled due to the weather, the unique features of that tournament (one section, G/120;d5, under prizes at U2100, U1900, U1700, U1500, and U1300/unrated, bonus upset prize) were transferred over to this year’s Harmon Memorial (the Neil Dale Memorial was rescheduled with the Portland Spring Open and used the Spring Open format). This year’s Harmon Memorial got thirty-five players. Micah Smith was the TD on Saturday and Mike Morris was the TD on Sunday. Mike Lilly helped with registration on Saturday. Mike Lilly and Mike Morris both gave a short remembrance of Clark before round 1. FM Corey Russell, a player from Medford, finished first with 4.5/5 and won $210. Corey also qualifies for the Oregon Invitational Tournament as the top Oregon finisher. However, he certainly would have qualified for the Invitational anyway based on rating and will almost certainly qualify for the higher level State Championship which runs alongside the Invitational. NM Matt Zavortink and NM William Lapham tied for second with 4/5 and split the second and third place prizes, each winning $114. H.G. Pitre, a player from the Seattle area, Gavin Zhang, and Scott Levin split the 1st U2100, 1st U1900, and 2nd U2100 prizes with 3.5/5, each winning $65. H.G. also gained around 70 rating points. Alan Rhoade and Isaac Vega split the 2nd U1900 prize, each winning $27. Alan graciously donated his winnings to the Harmon Memorial Fund which we use to have a higher prize fund for the Harmon Memorial. Isaac also gained around 50 rating points. Ralph Anthony, a player from the Seattle area, won the 1st U1700 prize of $70 with 3/5 and gained around 50 rating points. Roshen Nair, Brian Berger, and Abbie Wu split the 2nd U1700 prize with 2.5/5, each winning $18. Abbie also gained around 125 rating points, achieved a new peak rating, and achieved her 5th, 4th Category norm and thus was awarded the 4th Category Title (her performance was good enough that she achieved 3rd and 2nd Category norms as well). Roshen also achieved his 5th, 3rd Category norm and thus was awarded the 3rd Category Title. Zoey Tang won the 1st U1500 prize of $70 with 2.5/5 and gained around 85 rating points and a new peak rating. Jerrold Richards won the 2nd U1500 prize of $53 with 2/5. Harry Buerer won the 1st U1300/unrated prize of $70 with 2/5. Austin Tang won the 2nd U1300/unrated prize of $53 with 1.5/5. Micah Smith had the idea of adding a bonus upset prize to at least one of our tournaments and it makes the most sense to have an upset prize at a big one section tournament. Since it’s a bonus prize that players can win in addition to the other prizes, we decided we should be a little more restrictive as to who is eligible for the prize and we decided that you have to have an established US Chess rating (played at least 26 rated games) to be able to win the prize. We also decided not to count draws as half of an upset as is sometimes done. Arliss Dietz won the bonus upset prize of $50 by beating a player rated 356 points higher. There was one player playing in his first US Chess rated tournament, Ray Bourke from Corvallis.

Anthony He becomes FIDE Master

Anthony He became Washington State’s youngest ever FIDE Master on February 20, 2017 by scoring 5.5/9 at the 2017 WA State Chess Championship in Redmond. He gained 93.6 points to boost his FIDE rating over 2300. Anthony achieved the title 4 days after he turned age 12.  Anthony is currently the US number 1 FIDE rated player in his age group (U-12).  Congratulations, Anthony!

FM Anthony He Photo Credit: Xuhao He

Report on Portland CC March Quad 45

From Portland CC website. Report by the TD.

Quad 45 (March 18): This month the time control at the Quad 45 was changed from G/45;d15 to G/45;inc15. As far as we can tell, this is the first ever regular rated PCC tournament that used increment. There were several ideas behind switching from delay to increment. One reason is that increment is more fair than delay. For example, with a fifteen second delay, a player who uses one second on a move will have the same amount of time remaining for the game as a player who uses fifteen seconds, which doesn’t seem right. Another reason is that increment helps mitigate time pressure a lot better than delay. A third reason was simply to give players a little bit more overall time for their games. The round times for rounds 2 and 3 were pushed back slightly to accommodate expanding the time control as well as to give players a little bit more time off in between the rounds and the rounds are now scheduled at 10am, 12:30pm, and 3pm. This month’s Quad 45 was run by Micah Smith with assistance from Danny Phipps at registration, who also played in the event. It got a great turnout of twenty-eight players, tied for the second most ever at the Quad 45. Things worked out nicely this time in that we were able to simply have seven quads and didn’t have to adjust anything to avoid family members from having to play against each other and didn’t have to figure out where to put a five to seven player Swiss. One interesting thing that did crop up is that Jimmy Dee and Alex Gee had the exact same rating and one of them was going to have to be in Quad 5 and the other in Quad 6. Jimmy said he didn’t care which quad he was in and Alex said wanted to be in Quad 6 so he could be in the same quad as his two friends he came to the tournament with so Jimmy was put in Quad 5 and Alex was put in Quad 6. There was a clear winner in all seven sections. LM Carl Haessler won Quad 1 with 2/3 and won a book. Aaryan Deshpande, a player from the Seattle area, won Quad 2 with a perfect 3-0. He won a book and was also eligible to receive a trophy as a scholastic player who won his section with three points but declined. James Bean gained around 50 rating points in Quad 2. James Tsai won his quad at the Quad 45 for the second straight month, this time winning Quad 3 with 2.5/3. Quad 3 happened to be made up of the four players in the field who were rated in the 1500’s. James won a book and gained around 45 rating points. After gaining around 200 rating points from the 1st Annual Neil Dale Memorial Open, Zoey Tang added around 55 additional points to her rating by winning Quad 4 with 2.5/3. Quad 4 happened to be made up of the four players in the field who were rated in the 1400’s. She also won a book and a small trophy as a scholastic player who won her section with 2.5. Robert Bowden won Quad 5 with 2.5/3. He won a book, a small trophy as a scholastic player who won his section with 2.5, gained around 40 rating points, and achieved a new peak rating. Thomas Rolfs won Quad 6 with a perfect 3-0 and won a book. Max Alberhasky, who was playing in this first US Chess rated tournament, won Quad 7 with a perfect 3-0 and won a book. Henry Westlund added around 150 points to his provisional rating in Quad 7. There were three other players playing in their first US Chess rated tournament, Alex Gee, Benjamin Saunders, and James Hatch.

US Chess crosstables, CLICK HERE.

Jason Yu wins WA Barber Qualifier

From Washington Chess Federation Facebook Post.

The 2017 WA State Barber Qualifier held on March 11-12 at Chinook Middle School in Bellevue and Seattle Chess Club in Northgate. A little over 100 players took part in 6 sections: K-3U800, K-3U1400, 4-6U1000, 4-12U1400, K-12 U1600, and K-8 Open. The tournament was directed by David Hendricks with assistance from Josh Sinanan, Dan Mathews, and Chouchan Airapetian.

For US Chess crosstables CLICK HERE; for Northwest Chess Ratings table CLICK HERE.

Congratulations to Jason Yu, a 5th grader at Spiritridge Elementary School in Bellevue, for winning clear first in the K-8 Open section with 4.5/5 for the second consecutive year! For his victory, Jason qualifies to represent Washington State at the Barber Tournament of K-8 Champions and wins a $750 travel stipend donated by the Washington Chess Federation. The Barber tournament will be held in Norfolk, VA concurrently with the U.S. Open July 29 – August 6. Three players tied for second place in the K-8 Open with 4 points apiece: Eric Zhang, Owen Xuan, and Advaith Vijayakumar. Congratulations to all of the winners!

Chess for Success Event

From a Facebook post by Chess for Success.

The first day of the 50th Anniversary tournaments (March 10, 2017) is in the books. K-5 Team winners were: Jacob Wismer Elementary in 1st, four way tie for 2nd (Hope Chinese Charter School, Charlemagne French Immersion School, Glencoe Elementary, and Beach K-8) and a two way tie for 3rd (Sabin K-8 and Westridge Elementary.

The 6-8 champions are Roosevelt Middles School and Stoller Middle School. Poynter Middles School was 2nd and there were six teams in 3rd (Hosford Middle School, Astor K-8, Mt. Tabor Middle School, Jackson Elementary, Laurel Ridge Middle School and Ockley Green Middle School. CONGRATULATIONS all of the winners and all of the competitors. Event was held in Portland Oregon.

CLICK HERE for a report on KOIN TV.

Update BC vs WA Matches

From BCCF Bulletin #331 by Mr. Wright. For more info check HISTORY section of NWC website.

BC VERSUS WASHINGTON

Matches between BC and Washington chess clubs or cities have been going on for well over a century, but the first formal matches at a provincial/state level did not occur until the end of World War Two. But when exactly did these matches begin? It has been generally assumed that the first match was in 1944, in part based on an article by Dick Allen in the July 1949 issue of the Washington Chess Letter. He recounts the recent matches (1948 – a draw in Vancouver, 1947 – Peace Arch at Blaine, 1946 – Mount Vernon) before stating “Previous engagements took place at Vancouver in 1945 and Mount Vernon in 1944. To my knowledge, the latter was the opening of the friendly hostilities…” An anonymous article, presumably by editor Gerald Schain, appears in the June 1954 issue of the Washington Chess Letter with the same chronology, noting

Prior to 1946 there were two small informal matches played between B.C. and Northwest Washington and I do not have any record of them. These were the first and second Internationals and the big 1946 affair was the third International.

However, by April 1955 this same author was beginning to backpedal. Based on reports in Chess Review he now acknowledged there were two matches in 1947, one in March and one in August. Thus 1944 was discounted and the first match was indicated in 1945, although “lost.” Yet we know of a second match in 1946 as well, played in Vancouver in July as part of the Vancouver Diamond Jubilee celebrations. Thus there were two events in both 1946 and 1947 before the series became annual. This interpretation is confirmed by Chess Life of 5 April 1947:

Third and biggest of the series, the meeting of March 9 brought happy memories of the original International Tournament at Mount Vernon when the Skagit County Chess Club acted as hosts on March 24, 1946 and Washington won. The second meeting was in Canada in July, 1946 and the Canadians had their revenge with a stirring victory. A fourth meeting is planned for the future.

Given that there is absolutely no documentary evidence for matches in 1944 or 1945, and that it is high unlikely that such a contest would take place while the war was still on, the chronology of the early matches was as follows:

1st 1946 March 24 Mount Vernon 2nd 1946 July 13 Vancouver 3rd 1947 March 9 Mount Vernon 4th 1947 August 17 Peach Arch 5th 1948 August 8 Stanley Park

At the third match an exhibition game was played alongside the team competition between Olaf Ulvestad and Arthur Dake; team participants were given the option of playing a second game with their opponent or watching the exhibition game.

Ulvestad, Olaf – Dake, Arthur William [E26] Exhibition game Mount Vernon, 09.03.1947

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.a3 Bxc3+ 5.bxc3 c5 6.e3 Nc6 7.Bd3 d6 8.Ne2 e5 9.f3 Nh5 10.0–0 f5 11.Rb1 0–0 12.Qc2 Qh4 13.g3 Qh3 14.Rf2 Nf6 15.dxc5 dxc5 16.e4 fxe4 17.Bxe4 Nxe4 18.Qxe4 Qf5 19.Qxf5 Rxf5 20.Be3 b6 21.Rd1 Ba6 22.Rd6 Rf6 23.Rxf6 gxf6 24.g4 Na5 25.Ng3 Nxc4 26.Bc1 Rd8 27.Rc2 Bb7 28.f4 Bf3 29.fxe5 fxe5 30.h3 Rd3 31.Nf5 e4 0–1